Search Results for: software skills

Knowing what to study as an adult

After several years of being in the work world, you are likely to find yourself in a position where you are wanting to move jobs, get a promotion or start your own business. It is definitely a period of change and a deepening of understanding which direction you want to go into. It is often the pivotal point in your long-term career, where you have built some experience and have had some exposure but not if you’re ready to forge a clear way forward. It can be hard knowing what to go on to study that will equip you with what you need to make the next move. Here are a few ideas to picking your next learning pathway.

Project management course

You can do a diploma in project management because project management is underlying that supports just about anything you do in business and in your job. Having good project management will help you know how to manage people, manage budget and prioritise and execute tasks. You can choose whether to do your course online or through a university or college, but make sure that it is a recognised certificate or qualification that you can use to improve your resume.

Business acumen ability

Being in business you will want to have a better understanding of how business works overall, whether it be how money is made, money flows through the business or how the practice of management strategies, such as lean management can help improve cash flows and profits. There are several courses that can help develop your business acumen. Popular ones would be a diploma or master’s in business administration and while the name is a bit misleading, you will learn the basics of all aspects of business. This includes marketing, economics, accounting, and even human resources and logistics.

Go industry-specific

Depending on what industry you are in and what direction you are wanting to go and grow into, your further learning may be best suited around doing something that is industry-specific and helps. It could stand you in a good position if you’re looking to improve or motivate for a bigger paycheque because if you’re better skilled and qualified in your position, you will be highly valuable to your company.

General short courses

There are tonnes of short courses available online which don’t necessarily have the credibility of a university or college but do offer comprehensive learning tools to learn a particular skill. This could be a great way of identifying and boosting your skills and knowledge in something like software skills or in public speaking. The range of what is available is vast and you can almost do just about anything. Try to find a way to map your skills and identify the areas that you are lacking. Speak to your colleagues and bosses about what they’d like to see you do better at and find a course that can address that. The cost of these courses can be incredibly low because they work on a model of scale.

Choosing a Major and Getting on the Right Career Path at University of Phoenix

Choosing a degree program begins with understanding your strengths, interests and career aspirations. University of Phoenix helps prospective students, or anyone interested in answering these questions for themselves, with an online Career Interest Assessment tool. The tool walks users through 60 statements with answer selections to indicate how strongly they agree or disagree with the statements. At the end, the tool indicates a users’ leading strengths such as creative, social and investigative skills and indicates which career and degree programs are a strong fit for those traits.

Those interested in discovering more about the best degree program for their interests can also use University of Phoenix’s online Career Hub to look at the top 10 careers aligned to University of Phoenix degree programs. This also includes crucial information like salary range, projected growth and estimated job postings.

At University of Phoenix, prospective students can rest assured that they are learning career-relevant skills in every degree program. This way, they can turn their focus to exploring what they enjoy doing andthe type of role they see themselves in. Job Markets with the Best Growth and Earning Potential

Some of the top careers are in IT and healthcare based on growth and earning potential. A fact sheet from the Pew Research Center confirms that workers in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) careers earn more than their counterparts in other industries. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), “Employment in computer and information technology occupations is projected to grow 13 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations.” Relevant jobs include information security analysts, software developers and web developers.

And the BLS has reported that jobs in the physical, engineering, and life sciences are projected to more than double from original projections, leading to 55,600 new jobs by 2029. They note that similar job growth is projected in the pharmaceutical and medicine manufacturing industries to accommodate vaccine manufacture and production. With increased healthcare needs due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, retiring nurses and an aging population, the American Nurses Association reports that by 2022, there is projected to be more available registered nurse jobs available than any other occupation.

Skills-Aligned Degree Programs at University of Phoenix

Once prospective students have reached an understanding about their own strengths and the landscape of the current job market, they can begin an associate, bachelor’s, master’s or doctoral degree program at University of Phoenix that best aligns with their goals. Those interested in a career as an Information Security Analyst, for example, can pursue one of several degree programs in Cybersecurity at the University. Those interested in nursing can pursue an RN to Bachelor of Science in Nursing or Master of Science in Nursing, among other degree programs.

University of Phoenix offers both generous transfer credit options and Prior Learning Assessments (PLAs) that help reduce the time and cost of reaching a degree. With transfer credit options, students can cover up to 75 percent of the credits needed to complete their bachelor degree program. Using the University’s Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) credits, students can earn nontraditional credits for skills developed through professional roles such as IT certifications, military service, police academy training and real estate licenses. There are also options for students to receive PLA credits for life experiences, submitted via journal-style essays, for skills such as stress management, parenting and communicating in a virtual workplace. Some 65 percent of undergraduates at University of Phoenix are eligible for PLA credits, helping them to save on college costs and graduate faster.

About University of Phoenix

University of Phoenix is committed to advancing the educational goals of adult and nontraditional learners and provides maximum support for transfer students to reach their goals affordably. The University makes transferring credits easy and offers Prior Learning Assessments (PLAs) to provide credit for a number of employer-based trainings and life skills including IT skills, police and military work, retail experience, parenting, horticulture, arts, sports and other non-traditional skill sets, helping to reduce time and money toward a degree program.

In addition, University of Phoenix supports working adults and nontraditional learners with numerous scholarship opportunities, flexible schedules, online learning, career-guided degree programs. The University’s Career Services for Life® commitment to active students and graduates help students more effectively pursue career and personal aspirations while balancing their busy lives. For more information, visit www.phoenix.edu.

 

Computer Forensics: A Cyber Career Roadmap

Computer Forensics professionals get to use a lot of cool tools ... photo by CC user ErrantX on Flickr

Maybe you don’t like the idea of mopping up after a crime scene – the blood, the bullets etc. At the same time, you love piecing together mysteries. Thankfully, there’s still a job for you in computer forensics. Here’s what it’s all about and how plug yourself into this little-known, but exciting career.

Educational Requirements

To get into digital forensics, you need a good education. The requirements can be fairly minimal, however, in terms of the actual content, quality counts more than quantity. Many computer forensics professionals learn their skills “on the job,” with a strong basic foundation in computer programming or computer forensics.

Because many of the strategies and tactics change over time, it’s difficult to set hard and fast requirements for applicants. A working knowledge of computers is necessary, but beyond that, an investigator will have to be comfortable learning new hardware and software, some of which is custom and proprietary. They may also need special security clearance if they are working on government projects.

Degrees

For those without experience in law enforcement, military, or government, there are degrees. The most common one is an Associate Degree in computer forensics. This is a two-year course of study where the student completes general education courses that are specific to a career in computer forensics.

Various courses in cybercrime, intrusion detection systems, and basic legal protocols are covered. There is also some focus on technical writing, public speaking, and algebra.

Finally, with an Associate’s degree, the individual usually has to complete an internship before graduation. This internship gives the student work experience that will help in finding a job with a forensics specialist.

If a degree isn’t something you want to pursue, there’s also a professional certificate training course in computer forensics. This is a common method of learning the basics of computer forensics. Law enforcement or computer securities professionals usually go this route. Students enrolled in these types of programs usually have a computer or legal background, eliminating the need for additional schooling.

Certificate programs require less study – just 10 courses. However, it may be more challenging for those without prior education in computers.

And, while doctoral degrees in computer forensics aren’t common, they may be in the future as the need for forensics evolves and we become more and more dependent on electronics for daily living. More and more information is being stored in the cloud, on devices locally, and in increasingly complex systems.

Experience

A lot of computer forensics experts have experience in law enforcement, as a private investigator, or in the military. The most successful will also have extensive computer programming or some other related field experience. This digital forensics expert, for example, hires those with experience in law enforcement and intelligence organizations.

As with most jobs, the more experience, the better. Many of the best forensics experts and investigators are former FBI special agents, former CIA agents, former U.S. State Department officials, and professionals from international crime and anti-terrorism units.

Experience in behavioral science, latent fingerprinting, polygraph examinations, and traditional forensics doesn’t hurt either.

Jared Stern, a certified digital forensic examiner, is a federal and state court-admitted computer and cell phone forensics expert. Mr. Stern is also the President of Prudential Associates, an investigative agency that uses a powerfully-equipped forensics lab which goes above and beyond the capacity and capability of over 90 percent of U.S. law enforcement labs. His articles appear mainly on criminal science education and industry websites.

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