Tag Archives: career

Making a Difference: How to Choose Meaningful Work

When you’re working one of the most important things is motivation. If you’re insufficiently motivated, you’ll find yourself dragging your lumpen carcass out of bed on a Monday morning, resenting every minute of your commute and sleepwalking through your day, ending up with no energy to pursue personal projects or relaxation in your leisure time.

The best motivation comes from choosing work that’s meaningful to you. Work that makes a difference, so that at the end of every day, you know the effort you’ve put in is linked to very real results – people working in medicine, in social work, in substance misuse jobs deal with people every day and despite being frequently stretched for resources and under stress, get to make genuine differences to people lives every day (for the better, crucially).

If you don’t have the skills or, in fairness, inclination to pursue a job like this you need to either reframe your attitude to your existing job to emphasise how you’re making a difference, or find an alternative career to move into that lets you feel that you’re contributing in a meaningful way. You don’t need to be an ambulance driver or brain surgeon, just find a job that you feel is worthwhile or take a fresh look at your existing role to understand your real worth within the organisation.

If you’re in a position to change your job, think before you leap. If you’re dissatisfied and leap into a new position before you’ve really thought it through, you might find yourself just as dissatisfied and needing to sit in your new job for months or years before you can change again.

Be honest with yourself, and make sure you’re reorienting yourself towards a career that you find important and meaningful, not what is, on average, expected to be. There’s no point pursuing a career as a social worker to impress your friends with your social responsibility when you simply don’t have the motivation. If your strength is in administration, then you can put that towards a meaningful job in local government. If you’re into sales at heart, becoming an estate agent allows you to put your skills into finding people homes, and while estate and lettings agents can get a bad rap, if you deal fairly with people you’ll impress them and they’ll never forget you!

If you’re not able to change your job, talk to your manager about shadowing people in other departments. This gives you an insight into how your input is valued across the company and a new commitment it.

5 Signs that You Should Pursue a Career in Music

Music isn’t seen as a “career-driven” education direction by many. Most see it as a waste of time and money, with little prospects at the end of the road. However, the industry is changing and for those who succeed in landing a job, it can be a very fulfilling and rewarding career, not to mention lucrative.  However, if you are still on the fence about whether you should pursue a career in music you should read this article!

 pursue a career in music

Here are five signs that a music career could mean that it’s meant to be:

You are a Prodigy

Ok, this one might be a complete giveaway, but if you are crazy talented, and it’s not just your mom telling you this, a career in music is for you. Even if you do not make a name for yourself as the top violinist or tenor in the world, you still have a good chance to pursue a career in music in performing, composition, or something else like music journalism. Your education might actually be the thing you need to shape your direction and expose you to new things that might further inspire you. It also connects you with influencers in the music world, like your professors.

 

 You’re Great at Computers

This might initially sound strange, but give it a minute to sink in. So much of music is digitized nowadays, that being computer literate and good at music software can be what gets you exposure. Even if you yourself are not a great musician in the sense that you don’t play any instruments or sing, being able to engineer sound and produce music might get you more money than performing or recording your own music could. If mixing music and playing around with music software is your thing, it could lead you to consider a formation in a pro audio school.

 

 You’re Well Connected

This is definitely not a requirement, but having a music network to rely on once you’re done your education increases your chance for a great job in the field. Whether you have a family member in the industry, or have many friends who are already making waves and can introduce you to the right people, having those connections but choosing to do something else might mean that you are missing out on some great opportunities.

 

You’ve Got a Crafty Brain

Just because you want a career in music, doesn’t mean you have to study it! There are plenty of jobs in the industry that don’t require you to be a musician at all. From accountants, marketers, managers, and more, being smart and passionate about music can often get you further and land you a more stable job than those you would originally picture for someone in the music industry.

 

You’re Hard as Nails

A career in music means a lot of networking, a lot of “no’s”, tons of perseverance, and in the end: grit. The music industry is a tough one, and you need to be continuously proving yourself in order to stay relevant and successful. Its important to assess whether your chosen career will fit your personality.

If you are able to take criticism, yet have an unwavering belief in yourself, then you probably have what it takes to make a livelihood out of music. Though you don’t have to be topping the billboard charts, any artist or music industry partner who can pursue a career in music, pay the bills and live their ideal life thanks to a passion-filled and enjoyable job, is successful. 

A career for music isn’t for everyone. Remember that there are many who have dreamed and failed. However, there’s a lot of room in this industry and you could be one of those “lucky ones” living their dream life with the job they always wanted if you go ahead pursue your career in music.

5 Traits of Good Adult Educators

When students decide to go back to school to complete their education, they have certain expectations that educators should meet. These students probably tried school in the past and it did not work for them. One of the many different reasons that might have lead them to quit school in the first place could have been their student-teacher relationship at the time. Here are some of the traits good adult educators should have.

1. Ability to Create a Conducive Atmosphere

Adult classes are usually smaller and instructors often deal with a handful of students. It is, therefore, imperative that the educator is able to create a conducive learning atmosphere that is all-inclusive. In order to achieve this type of atmosphere, the instructor needs to be able to encourage the students to acknowledge other people’s views and learn how to calmly express their own. The educator should also ensure that there is no criticism and bad energy.

2. Good Leadership

A good adult educator must be able to show commendable leadership skills when dealing with students. Great leadership will ensure that there is always order and a sense of self-discipline within the class. The students need to respect both you and your methods for classes to go smoothly.

3. Act as Good Examples

Students often look up to their adult educator as a role model. The instructor should be able to cite real-life examples while making the class a little bit more personal. For example, when an educator brings to light the fact that they had to study at Rutgers Online in order to get an online master of education in adult and continuing education, this could give the students motivation that they too can make it. It also acts as a motivation for them to consider an online MEAD program later in life to help others in their shoes.

4. Reward Promptly

Respect is crucial to adult students and a lot of emphasis must be put on it. Their earlier education experience might have left them feeling ignored or marginalized. Their educators should be able to reward them promptly when they achieve certain goals or perform well. The rewards could be just sincere compliments and doesn’t need to be anything physical; positive reinforcement works.

5. Build Relationships

Students commonly return to school for a more personal experience, something larger than what they experienced before. Adult educators should, therefore, ensure that they build individual relationships between them and every student. The instructors should deal with their issues concerning their education in a different but specific manner for every one of them. Since you’ll have to deal with fewer students, you’ll be able to give them more special attention and cater to their needs.

Conclusion

Adult educators have far greater responsibility than ordinary teachers and they need to be able to cope with it. However, it can be a very rewarding, as you’ll be able to directly affect your students’ lives and see them turn their lives around before your very eyes.

 

 

7 Job Ideas For Compassionate People 

Some people have a natural gift for caring about others. They innately feel warmth and empathy toward other people, and have no trouble experiencing sympathy when somebody else is going through a difficult time. Such compassionate people may feel that it’s difficult to find a solid career path that allows them to practice these skills on a daily basis. Fortunately, such jobs do exist. Try one of these careers if you want to put your compassion to good use.

 

  1. Caring for the very young or old: There’s a serious shortage of people out there that want to work with very small children or the elderly, and this role is ideal for compassionate, loving people with a drive to assist others. If you’re interested in helping those who can no longer look after themselves, there are aged care courses melbourne that can help get you started in this rewarding field.
  2. Education: The education field is packed with compassionate people. It takes a certain type of personality to patiently walk children through their studies, especially when dealing with more difficult students or those with learning disabilities. Whether you want to work with little ones in primary teaching or help university students succeed, teaching could be the right profession for you.
  3. Counselling and psychology: Everybody needs someone to talk to from time to time. If you could see yourself offering a listening ear to those who are struggling with mental illness or going through a tough time, you should definitely look into counselling and psychology. This field is best suited to empathetic people who can develop an interest in other peoples’ lives without getting attached in an unhealthy way.
  4. Veterinarian: Some compassionate people are more comfortable working with animals than they are with humans. They could do well working as a veterinarian. Vets care for sick pets and farm animals, and can use their warm personality to soothe stressed animals and help their panicked owners calm down.
  5. Medicine: While there are many different jobs involved in the medical field, most of them require some degree of compassion. When it comes to hands-on roles like that of a doctor or nurse, a friendly personality and plenty of emotional support is key for the patients. While medical training comes first, people working in this field also need to learn to have a warm bedside manner that helps their patients feel comfortable.
  6. Social work: Social workers play a vital role in our society. They help some of the most disadvantaged and vulnerable people in society to get back on their feet, guide them toward the right resources for their needs, and support those who are going through difficult experiences. Social work requires a great deal of sensitivity and strong people skills, allowing you to connect with people and support them in a valuable way.
  7. Volunteer: If you already have a professional job but want to use your skills to help others outside of office hours, there may be plenty of opportunities for volunteering your community. Look into local charities and non-profit organisations and find out where you could be put to good use. Most charities are pleased to have volunteers come forward to assist and will be happy to give you a chance to work with them.

Van Business in UK: Are the stresses and Strains Worth the Investment?

Starting a van business is no doubt lucrative, especially when you get the equation right, but it can be strenuous and even excruciating to keep it going. Anyone might say it is normal for any business to appear daunting at first, but with a van business, is the stress simply not worth it?

Why many start van businesses

There are a number of good reasons to start a van business, with one of them being the simple fact that you have an unused or underutilised van sitting in a corner. The smartest move to make in such a case would surely be to put your van to some profitable use as long as you have a bit of time on your hands.

With a van business, you get to choose the customers you want to serve as the business is versatile and you can engage in a diverse range of work. You get to decide whether you would rather focus on one niche and if business dries up on that end, you and your van can always move to something else. There is also the fact that van businesses will always be in demand, particularly because of the role technology has come to play in selling, with a higher demand for delivery services.

To cap it all, you get to choose when you work, the scale of business you are willing to take on, and how you work. It is the flexibility that makes van business a winner for some.

The ugly side of van business

As many are enticed to start a van business as a result of its many benefits, there are also many who turn away from it due to the associated stresses and strains of the business. Perhaps because they have experienced the uglier side of the venture or because they have heard the horror stories, former van drivers and intending ones change their minds about van business.

Van drivers in the UK often have to drive longer distances and spend longer behind the wheel. This is not healthy, both physically and mentally. After an entire day of driving, the pain can be unbearable and the fatigue would knock you out. Yet, van drivers are expected to get up again the following day and continue.

Doing it right

Driving a van to make a living does not have to be a hellish experience once you are able to do it right. Sometimes, it is the smallest things we do that make all the difference. For example, to avoid long term effects such as elevated blood pressure, you should take a break whenever you start to feel anxious while you are driving. What you need at that moment is to relax and calm yourself.

De-stressing after a long drive is also very important, however you prefer to do it. The bottom line is once you take charge of your health and work, ultimately you’ll be fine.

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