Will your chosen career fit your personality?

You may not realise it but your career choice says a lot about your identity and your personality. Over the years you probably know what interests you, your likes and dislikes and this will help you to decide what sort of work you’d like to undertake.

Research has shown that generally women veer towards career paths which are more social (think caring profession) while men are doers and that’s why they often take up more analytical roles in engineering.

For example, people who like exploring possibilities and like to look to the future may be a suitable fit for a career in marketing or advertising whereas a person who likes dealing in the present might want to be a chef or work in retail. People who look at things on a wider scale and have great spatial awareness might make good architects. Those who are more thoughtful may end up as economists or psychologists.

Related: Women at Wells Fargo 27% more likely to lose job

To help you establish whether your career path bodes well for the future, you may like to consider these few points below.

Interests

The world would be a dull place if we were all the same. From a very early age we make decisions about what we enjoy and what we don’t. Think about those things which make you happy. Growing up you may have decided to pursue a specific sport, because it gave you a level of enjoyment. Your personal preferences can influence your choice on a career selection. Would you like to work outside or in an office?

Strengths

You wouldn’t enter a career if you knew you didn’t have the right aptitude for it so look at your personal strengths. The so called “Holland Code” was introduced in the late 1950’s and introduced the idea that careers and vocational choices could be based on personality types. Certain professions were ideal for those with certain traits. Here are some examples:

  • Doers – Realistic type roles such as drivers and firefighters
  • Thinkers – Investigative type roles such as lawyers and chemists
  • Creators – Artistic roles such as interior designers or journalists
  • Helpers – Social roles such as social workers or teachers
  • Persuaders – Enterprising roles such as buyers and fundraisers
  • Organisers – Conventional roles such as librarians or accountants

Solo or group working

Do you enjoy working as part of a team in collaborative efforts or do you prefer to work on your own? Some people prefer team focussed roles and like the support of others to achieve tasks while others like tackling activities on their own and get a real rush of excitement making solo decisions. Consider how you may like to work and the surrounding work environment.

Remember if in doubt, you can always speak to a career counsellor to discuss your options. TrainSmart Australia has career counsellors who can talk through your choices and suggest possible courses. TrainSmart Australia is a Registered Training Organisation has been delivering high quality superior training to thousands of people across Australia since it was established in 2007. Students can study a wide range of diploma courses under five colleges, with each one focussing on a specific industry to provide tailored learning.

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